37 Sad Quotes That Will Get You Through the Worst Days

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Sadness—never, ever, something that we actively summon or wish to feel—manages to find its way to us every now and then. It’s a natural part of life. But sometimes it helps to know that others are going (or have been) through the same thing. Because that means that things will get better, start looking up. If you’re experiencing tough times or dealing with loss, this list of sad quotes will, oddly enough, provide some comfort and comradery. And if you’re on the verge of just needing a good cry, these emotional quotes will happily help release an onslaught of soul-cleansing tears. Some were penned by your favorite Southern authors; others were said by important historic figures. But all have one thing in common: They just get it. Keep reading for 37 sad quotes that’ll help you get through a bad day, crappy month, or terrible year. (And when you’ve come out on the other side, check out these funny love quotes that we can all relate to—it’ll lighten the mood.)

Sad Quotes about Life

“There are moments when I wish I could roll back the clock and take all the sadness away, but I have the feeling that if I did, the joy would be gone as well.” –Nicholas Sparks

“Life’s under no obligation to give us what we expect.” –Margaret Mitchell

“You see, I usually find myself among strangers because I drift here and there trying to forget the sad things that happened to me.” –F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.” –Mark Twain

“Things change. And friends leave. And life doesn’t stop for anybody.” –Stephen Chbosky

“Life is a moderately good play with a badly written third act.” –Truman Capote

“I have learned now that while those who speak about one’s miseries usually hurt, those who keep silence hurt more.” –C.S. Lewis

“The excursion is the same when you go looking for your sorrow as when you go looking for your joy.” Eudora Welty

“Don’t ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.” –J.D. Salinger

Sad Quotes about Death

“So it’s true, when all is said and done, grief is the price we pay for love.” –E.A. Bucchianeri

“What is hardest to accept about the passage of time is that the people who once mattered the most to us wind up in parentheses.” –John Irving

“Our dead are never dead to us until we have forgotten them.” –George Eliot

“The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone.” –Harriet Beecher Stowe

“It is the unknown we fear when we look upon death and darkness, nothing more.” –J.K. Rowling

“It’s sad when someone you know becomes someone you knew.” –Henry Rollins

“There is a time for departure, even when there’s no certain place to go.” –Tennessee Williams

“You meet everyone twice in this life, when they come and when they go.” –C.C Aurel

“Grief is not as heavy as guilt, but it takes more away from you.” ­–Veronica Roth

“Death is a great revealer of what is in a man, and in its solemn shadow appear the naked lineaments of the soul.” –E.H. Chapin

“Death is the dropping of the flower that the fruit may swell.” –Henry Ward Beecher

Check out 115 Sympathy Messages for Friends and Family.

Sad Love Quotes

“You know, a heart can be broken, but it keeps on beating, just the same.” –Fannie Flagg

“It’s amazing how someone can break your heart, and you can still love them with all the little pieces.” –Ella Harper

“There is a distinct, awful pain that comes with loving someone more than they love you.” –Steve Maraboli

“To have been loved so deeply, even though the person who loved us is gone, will give us some protection forever.” –J.K. Rowling

“If you gave someone your heart and they died, did they take it with them? Did you spend the rest of forever with a hole inside you that couldn’t be filled?” –Jodi Picoult

“You make me feel like a firefly. Trapped in a belljar; starved for love.” –Ayushee Ghoshal

“You’re like a song that I heard when I was a little kid but forgot I knew until I heard it again.” –Maggie Stiefvater

“There is no greater sorrow than to recall, in misery, the time when we were happy.” –Dante Aligheri

Check out 120 Romantic Messages for Your Loved Ones.

Sad Sayings

“Sometimes you got to hurt something to help something. Sometimes you have to plow under one thing in order for something else to grow.” –Ernest J. Gaines

“Tears are words the mouth can’t say nor can the heart bear.” –Joshua Wisenbaker

“Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, ‘It might have been.'” –Kurt Vonnegut

“Being a successful person is not necessarily defined by what you have achieved, but by what you have overcome.” –Fannie Flagg

“To have felt too much is to end in feeling nothing.” –Dorothy Thompson

“One thing you can’t hide is when you’re crippled inside.” –John Lennon

“There are years that ask questions and years that answer.” –Zora Neale Hurston

“Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.” –Christopher Morley

“Tears come from the heart and not from the brain.” –Leonardo da Vinci

Is Your Childhood Blueprint Holding You Back?

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Do you find you don’t deal with situations or relationships as successfully as you’d like? Do you feel depressed, anxious, or think negative things about yourself, others or the world? If so, it could be that your blueprint is holding you back.

You can think of your blueprint as everything you felt, saw, thought, touch, tasted, laughed or cried at. Millions of experiential data points creating your unique map of how the world works. But a map created before you are cognitively mature enough to understand or handle difficult situations.

Because this blueprint comes from the cause and effect on a child mind there can be limitations on how we now see the world. If we had good mentoring, a stable view of ourselves, and satisfying relationships, then it’s likely we’ll have a healthy blueprint. However, if we experienced poor mentoring, a negative view of ourselves, with less than stable relationships, then our blueprint could be more dysfunctional. Leading us to see the world as unpredictable, uncaring and even traumatic.

These are simplistic extremes for sure, and most people’s lives are far less black and white. However, the point is the same: no matter how the creation of our blueprint happened, it will influence our adult decision-making for the rest of our lives. If this blueprint is mostly dysfunctional, it can leave us vulnerable to mental health issues unless we take steps to change our reoccurring unhealthy responses.1

Our blueprint is important because it plays an integral part in everything we do. Without being aware of it, every day your brain is constantly using your blueprint to predict your environment by following pre-programmed, default responses for familiar tasks2 :how you cook dinner, how you eat, drive, order your coffee, etc. It doesn’t matter the situation, you’ll have a response ready: In this situation you will = think this, feel this, and act like this. And most of the time this is okay. But what happens when we come across a situation that our younger self couldn’t deal with in a healthy way?

Let’s say you had difficulties feeling worthy and appreciated as a child and one day at work your boss shouts at you in front of your colleagues? How do you respond? Well, that’s up to your old blueprint. In less than a second your brain is accessing how you managed similar situations in the past. Maybe it accesses the time you were 12 and a teacher shouted at you in front of the class. You cried and the shame you felt was painful. So, now in front of your boss, your blueprint tells you to “stay quiet and shut down your feelings.” So, that is exactly what you do. Your old responses leaving you helpless in the face of an aggressive other.

If you think you don’t manage certain situations or people well, it might be time edit your old blueprint. To do this, I encourage you to reflect on any given situation you struggle with. Once you have a situation, park any preconceived notion you have about yourself. It doesn’t matter if the situations were wrong, or unfair, the goal is to examine your thinking, feeling, and behaviors analytically. You want to discover whether your blueprint helps or hurts you. What responses you want to keep and which to replace.

Here are six questions to get started.

  1. Is this my typical response in this situation?
  2. Have I reacted this way before (i.e. is this habitual responding)?
  3. What event from my past does this situation/person remind me of?
  4. Does my current reaction help me or hurt me?
  5. How would I prefer to respond/react to this challenging situation?
  6. What do I tell myself that stops me from responding in this healthier way?

Now you have this new information, you can get to work on practicing your new responses. With time, effort, and practice, these new habitual responses will happen naturally. But be aware, you might have another hidden habitual response that stops you from making these changes “just in case” things get worse. And it’s this cycle of wanting to change but fearing change that keeps many people stuck in the same blueprint.

It is worth acknowledging a lot of our old blueprint emerged as self-protection. Created during a time when being turned down by someone you had a crush on hurt to the core. Or when kids laughing at you felt like the most shameful experience you could ever imagine. As children a lot of things seemed like the end of the world, but as adults they’re not even close. If a person you like turns you down, that’s okay. If other people laugh at you for making a mistake, you’ll survive just fine. You really don’t have to follow the same program over and over, you can change it.

Breaking old habits is hard, but creating a new adult blueprint will help make you more confident and robust in the face of all life’s challenges.

8 Ways to Feel Happier at Home When Winter’s Bringing You Down

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Depressed woman at home during Christmas

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During winter, aside from the weather being miserably cold, the days can be very gloomy and dark (literally), which can have a serious affect on your mood. If you find yourself feeling down during this seemingly ever-lasting season, you’re not alone. The winter blues are common, and additionally, an estimated 10 million Americans have Seasonal Affective Disorder. The form of depression, also known as SAD, is a recurrent major depressive disorder that involves episodes of depression at the same season each year.

According to Psychology Today, treatment for symptoms of SAD include combinations of antidepressant medication, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counseling. Regardless of what your personal situation is, there are several things you can do at home to boost your mood during winter. Home should be a happy place, and somewhere that cultivates good feelings and mindset for you. Here are some ways to help kick the winter blues right from home:


Light Your Favorite Candle

White room interior decor with burning hand-made candle and bouq
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The right scent can help your state of mind, and according to research from the Association for Psychological Science, floral scents boost feelings of happiness. So, burn that rose-scented candle you love, or even treat yourself to some fresh-cut blooms.

Small Damascena Rose Candle

diptyqueparis.com

$38.00

Make Your Bed When You Wake Up

Morning duties
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Gretchen Rubin, author of the best-selling book, The Happiness Project, says that the happiness-project resolution that’s made the biggest difference in readers’ happiness is often “Make your bed.” It’s a nice start to a productive day, and after a long day of work (and braving the cold), coming home to a made-bed is the best feeling.

Display Photos Of Favorite Memories (Maybe From A Tropical Vacay?)

Photographs on a mantelpiece
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Nostalgia can go a long way, it turns out. Researchers from Loyola Universityreport that thinking about good memories for even 20 minutes a day can make people more cheerful than they were a week before. Frame some of your favorite photos from your last vacation, or family event (if those are fond memories for you). Each time you pass the photo on your dresser, or hanging in the hallway, it’ll jog your memory of happy times.

Use Mirrors To Maximize Natural Light

Bright cozy room
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According to interior designer Lane McNab, the first step to feeling happier at home is creating a “soothing, light-filled environment.” She told MyDomaine, “Find ways to accentuate the natural light you have available (where possible). One of her tricks to maximizing that bit of sunshine? “Try using strategically placed mirrors, across from a window with a beautiful view or in a dark corner to brighten it up…This is especially important if you’re susceptible to the winter blahs.” Alright, then—mirrors it is!

WEST ELM
Floating Wood Floor Mirror

westelm.com

$399.00

Get Some Greenery

Green plants and art books on parquet floor, Nancy, France
GETTY IMAGESETIENNE JEANNERET

Aside from adding life to a room, plants absorb toxins, purify the air, and can actually reduce noise levels. Even better? They’re a mood-booster, too. “Plants relieve stress and make a home seem more cozy,” says Christopher Satch, head of plant science and education at The Sill.

Use A Light Therapy Alarm Clock

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AMAZON

Getting out of bed in the morning is hard enough, but when the weather is gross, it makes it even more difficult. There are different lamps and alarm clocks you can get that provide sunrise simulation that help you wake up feeling more refreshed and happier. The Phillips Wake-Up Light, for example, has a colored sunrise simulation and a light that gradually increases 20 to 40 minutes before your alarm goes off. The company says the Wake-Up Light is proven to wake you up with “improved mood and energy level.”

SHOP NOW Phillips Wake-Up Light Alarm Clock, amazon.com

Get A Jump Start On Your Spring Cleaning

Take a cue from Marie Kondo, and start tidying up! You’re likely spending a lot of time inside anyway, so why not be productive while you’re at it? Decluttering, reorganizing, and deep-cleaning will not only give you different tasks to focus on, but once you’re finished, you will feel refreshed and accomplished.

Paint A Wall A Bright Color

Wall painting
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Psychotherapist and wellness expert Jenny Giblin, MFT, told Prevention that though you may not be able to control the weather, you can control your own environment. Try painting a wall in your home a fun, brighter color, or hanging cheery artwork.