Tell me if you can relate to this: When a new week approaches, you feel stressed out because you’re not prepared at all. By the end of the week, you feel frustrated because you didn’t use your time in the most productive way.We’ve all had the Sunday scaries for the week ahead. We’ve all left…

via 5 Ways To Plan Your Most Productive Week — The Blissful Mind

People Who Value Time More Than Money Are Happier and More Productive

Author Article

Money is deeply rooted in how we’ve evolved. It continues to produce powerful effects on our behavior.We spend a great deal of time thinking about money.

We talk about it, worry over it, stress over it, and wonder if we have enough to meet our immediate needs now and in the future.


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Most of us never seem to have enough, and we’re spending a good chunk of it earning money.

An additional $5,000 a year could make a huge difference in your life.

But, according to research, people who value time more than money are happier and more productive in life.

Prioritizing time is associated with greater happiness.

The scientists ran several studies, both online and in-person.

Over 4,000 people were asked the same question:

You guessed right.

Most people were practical: Around 64 percent surveyed answered “more money.”

But the people who said they’d prefer more time were generally happier.

But the research goes beyond that.

“What matters is the value people place on each resource,” the authors said.

“Beyond the amount of these resources people have, happiness is linked to the resource people want.”

The study further revealed something else about the participants. Brian Resnick of Vox writes:

People who tended to choose more time also tended to be:

  • Older, which suggests perhaps as we age we get more satisfaction from valuing our time over money
  • Parents, which suggests children can change our values on the time-money question
  • Married
  • Wealthier (but when the analysis controlled for this, the correlation between choosing time and happiness remained)

The study suggests that if you want to become a happier person — and you already make enough money to provide the essentials — you should start placing more value on time.

It’s also important to note that for some people, prioritizing money over time is a necessity, not a choice because they otherwise could not afford the essentials, even if they might prefer to prioritize time if they had a choice.

Plan your future time, today

Wealth is the ability to fully experience life. — Henry David Thoreau

The findings suggest your mentally towards TIME and MONEY has a lot to do with your happiness and level of productivity in life.

It doesn’t really matter which of the two a person has more of — instead, it’s all about a person’s mentality toward the two.

Even though money — or the lack thereof — is often cited as one of the most stress-inducing aspects of life, people who value their time more than their money are more likely be happier despite the amount of money they have.

Think about it: Money can come and go, but time only goes and doesn’t come back. Once lost, it’s gone.

“No matter what the outcome of our efforts, we all feel increasingly strapped for time, and often the things that we think will make us happy — the accomplishments we work so hard for — don’t. They most certainly do not give us back moments with our families and friends or more hours to ourselves,” writes Ashley Whillans on HBR.

How much is your time is worth?

What price would you put on an experience that broadens the mind, or brings you inner peace?

There are two kinds of people: those with time-first mindset and those with money-first mindset.

Many people fall in the second category.

When faced with a time-or-money decision, most people will choose money?

It’s more difficult to shift to a time-first mindset if you have valued money more than time for a very long time.

Shifting to a time-first mindset is really hard, especially when everything in your life depends on that income you make every month.

If you don’t know much your time is worth, it won’t even cross your mind to value time more than money.

How you use your time might be slightly more in your control than how much money you earn.

With more time, you can plan to use it better. How you value time is absolutely in your control.

Assuming basic needs are met, more money will give you just that — more money.

Research shows that once people make more than enough to meet their basic needs, additional money does not reliably promote greater happiness.

Yet over and over, our choices do not reflect this reality.

More time, on the other hand, could lead to all kinds of amazing experiences and shifts that might mean more to you than money ever could.

A focus on time builds more-rewarding careers.

People who value their time are more likely to pursue careers that they love.

And when people love what they do, they are less negatively affected by the stress of work, and are more likely to be more productive, creative and effective.

They also are less likely to quit.

Key takeaway

Time, not money, is your greatest investment.

Money helps you strive to live your life, but it’s time itself that gives you the greatest benefit.

Budget time carefully — as carefully as you would money.

Make choices that give you more time.

The next time you’re making a tough choice between having more time or more money, think of your happiness, stress-free life, if you can, not just your wallet.

This article first appeared on Medium

Ah, our days off are wonderful aren’t they?, or maybe they are not, maybe they are too short, well they might be, but that could mean our days off are not being used wisely. The time off is our chance to be productive, and work on ourselves. We have the time, energy, and freedom to […]

via Make Your Days Off Productive — Psychology of Mindfulness

How Oxytocin Can Help Us Be More Neurologically Productive

Author Article

Invariably, a hoard of studies exploring the famously ambiguous hormone knows as oxytocin begin to pepper the internet around Valentine’s Day. What we do know about the pituitary function however-its profound effect on childbearing, empathy and social interaction, is more than enough to warrant its dubbing as “The Love Hormone.”Tend and defendThe endocrinology is simultaneously a punch to the gut and a pat on the back.On one hand, it’s a little underwhelming to know that all of the things that make us feel warm and husky can be traced to a gland residing in the rotting meat in our heads. But it’s somehow concurrently comforting to know why and how we love someone can be vividly sketched by neurology.

As it turns out love is encouraged and mediated by a temperate-mathematic entity; every kiss and hug funded by a network of hypothalamic animations. But oxytocin doesn’t retire once bonds have been successfully established between mates.

The neuropeptide is expressed primarily in women as it helps with increasing uterine contractions during labor and cervical dilation. It promotes the nurturing maternal link by surging in accordance with things like a child’s cry and suckling.

Oxytocin levels increase in recent father’s as well, though its stimulation belongs to different factors; arousing play, focus on joint exploration, and stimulatory touch specifically.

More grimly, the neurotransmitter has been proven to inspire intolerance. A study conducted back in 2014, examined two groups of Dutch men: one group given oxytocin, the other given placebos.

Both groups were tasked with choosing five men they would give lifeboats to. The ones on oxytocin were found to be more likely to reject Muslim or German-sounding names, while the placebo group’s decisions were notably less informed by superficial factors.

The hormone’s mission to tend and defend makes us more prone to form allegiances towards those with similar characteristics and just as well more readily aware of distinctions.

We are genetically presupposed to crumble in the presence of tribalism.

Neuroeconomics

There are less obvious by-products of the hypothalamus as well.  Because oxytocin impacts our ability to process social cues, it indirectly correlates to our productivity in the workplace.

In an attempt to better comprehend the effect neurology has on a healthy corporate community, neuroeconomist Paul J. Zak, successfully administered synthetic oxytocin into living brains during an experiment in the early 2000s.  His team of researchers found increased levels of the hormones to have a clear effect on the firm’s profitability and the feelings of fulfillment in those cohabiting it.

According to Zak, productivity lives and dies by one stipulation: a strong community composed of members that have a clear understanding of their purpose within it.

Being rewarded trust by another increases levels of oxytocin significantly. Individuals with higher levels of oxytocin are found to have lower levels of stress, depression and be more apt at social interaction.

The same tend and defend mechanic can apply to a corporation. Employers are biologically incentivized to work harder for those they feel bonded towards.

Zak remarks: “These laboratory studies showed that when trust between team members is high, oxytocin flows and work feels less like, well, work, and more like doing interesting things with friends. ”

Organic methods of raising oxytocin

The production of oxytocin is all about catering to all the things that bring you joy. Considering the intimate things that make us happy is sort heretical in the corporate world, but it has an undeniable affect on its ability to thrive. Pet a dog, listen to music, copulate, take a bubble bath, hug a baby, (your own baby please).

The great thing about oxytocin though is that it responds equally to feeling good as it does to making others feel good. Giving gifts has been studied to raise levels of the hormone. Perfect timing too. People that receive chocolate and flowers exhibit higher levels of oxytocin, as do people that bequeath them.

It’s an evolutionary mistake not to revel in love and empathy.

The Best List You’ll Ever Make To Be More Effective

Author Article Here
By MARY LEE GANNON

We all have to-do lists, project objectives, metrics and planners to help keep us on track in our daily lives. Each year we set high expectations and even with these tools we find ourselves frustrated because we don’t have the structure, systems, or accountability in place to achieve our goals. Couple that with doubt and indecision and you have a perfect recipe for anxiety. In the worst case this leads to action paralysis.Let’s talk about the best case. Most people know what they need to do to be happy, effective and thrive just not how to do it or what to do with doubt and fear. We spend enough time telling ourselves how we are not equipped to succeed and armoring up against failure by being risk averse. We wallow proficiently on what it is we need to do but spend less time feeling what it would be like to actually live the dream and executing a plan to get there. Guarding against danger is how we have evolved as a species and not become extinct.

We are Jedis at searching the environment for danger. We are not innately good at promoting ourselves into opportunity. Opportunity isn’t essential to stay alive. Staying safe is. Let’s reverse the pattern.

The purpose of creating this list is: 1) to give you definition around the areas where you thrive so that you can spend more time there especially when challenged, and 2) to build self-awareness around opportunities for growth that increase your executive presence and effectiveness.

The best list you’ll ever make to be more effective

Create two columns, side by side, on a sheet of paper numbered one to 10. A word document is good for this exercise so that you may modify it as time goes on.

 FIRST COLUMN: Label this “I AM THIS”

  1. Think of a time from your childhood when you were at your very best – happy, included, a star.  Write down 3 words that describe who you were in that situation.  What were you doing, thinking and feeling and how were you behaving? Examples: Listening, Planning, Being Vulnerable, Compassionate, Gentle, Strong, Tenacious, Resourceful, Confident, Capable, Open.    
  2. Think of a time professionally when you were at your very best and write down 3 words that describe what you were doing, thinking and feeling and how you were behaving.
  3. Think of a peak personal moment where you felt appreciated, respected, effective and write down 4 more words that describe who you were in that situation.

SECOND COLUMN: Label this “NOT THAT”

    1. Next to each entry in Column 1 write what you are doing when you are NOT at your best specific to the corresponding behavior beside it. This should reflect what you exhibit or the feel when you are NOT leading from that point of strength. If your point of strength is ‘Tenacious’ what are you doing when you don’t feel that? Weak? Ineffective? Examples for NOT THAT words are: Threatened, Criticized, Afraid of ____, Distracted, Losing Control, Abandoned, Disappointed, Challenged.

The list on the left is who you truly are at your core. This list on the right is what happens to you when you don’t feel that way. Knowledge is power so be honest when you create the list. Now when you feel one of the negative feelings or exhibit one of the negative behaviors from the second column revisit the first column to see precisely what you need to focus on to get back to a position of strength. For more career strategies get the FREE report: 31 Success Practices for Leaders in the High Stakes Corporate World. https://www.maryleegannon.com/31-success-practices-for-leaders

 Challenging situations occur in everyone’s lives that often impart feelings of despair. Fear can set in followed by repeated defensive behaviors that draw you away from your ability to thrive in your career, goals and relationships with confidence.  Post this list where will you will see it every day to remind yourself of where your strengths lie and what to focus on when negative feelings or behaviors surface. 

Next time you are feeling anxious look at this list and the correlating positive word that is at your core. That is the very thing you want to reflect on, meditate on, create a plan around. Now you have an actionable strategy to reverse the negativity!

The Morning Routine That Can Completely Change Your Productivity Levels

See Author Article Here
By Jack Canfield

In this video, Entrepreneur Network partner Jack Canfield talks about some of the small tweaks in your morning that can lead to more success.

A few habits successful people to each morning may sound familiar to you: meditation, exercise and something uplifting.

Another habit Canfield emphasizes is the tendecy of being an early riser. Canfield mentions that many successful business leaders wake up before the sun rises, mainly to get ahead of their days or begin diving into reading early. This habit feeds into Canfield’s personal habit of a morning power hour. Canfield explains that this slice of time has drastically improved his mental health, as well as empowered him to make better decisions.

Canfield ends with this: Small changes in your routine can have a big impact on your daily results.

Click the video to hear more about the optimal morning routine.

5 Ways To Have The Most Productive Day Ever

See Author Article Here

Time waits for no woman, but who says you’ve got the hours to hang around and wait for time? We’ve all got meetings to take, conference calls to make, places to be and deals to close. But instead of getting consumed by the hours in the day, or the lack thereof, here are five ways to watch the clock and have your most productive day ever.

1. Pick a realistic time to wake up

You know your body and you know how much sleep you need to feel rested and ready to take on the day. And yet, we all tend to get a little overzealous when it comes to setting our alarms the night before. If I set my alarm an hour early, we rationalize, I will get a jump on my day.

Call it wishful thinking or good intentions, setting our alarms earlier than needed has the opposite effect than intended. When the early am hits, we hit snooze, falling in and out of that interrupted sleep until the moment we dash out of bed in a hurry. It’s a terrible way to start the day.

One, it makes us feel like we already missed our mark. That even though we didn’t need to wake up early, we should have. This mentality creeps into the rest of our day and doesn’t allow us to be our most productive or confident self. When you start the day disappointed in yourself, it’s that much harder to recover.

Two, alarm-hitting snooze sleep is almost worse than no sleep at all. You’re groggy and multiple studies have shown that this kind of sleep inertia reduces productivity and focus.

So be realistic about what time you need to get up. Pretending you’re going to rise at 6 am is not useful when you could sleep until 7 am and wake up bright-eyed and ready to get after it.

2. Turn your internet off for 45 minutes each morning

Scroll through your emails on your phone quickly to make sure there is no pressing emergency, but once your computer comes to life, switch the internet off.

Give yourself 45 minutes to respond to emails in a thoughtful and valuable manner. We’ve become so concerned with rapid-fire quick responses that our emails are lacking in quality. If you’re the type to email the way you text, this pause will prove productive.

Not only will you think through your answers with more clarity, but you won’t be distracted by other incoming messages, emails, or lose yourself to a Facebook news feed.

3. Time to batch it out

Time batching is a simple way to approach the day that reduces clutter and increases focus. Group activities together (emails, phone calls, blogging—i.e. writing multiple posts at one time) and see how it improves your product.

By batching out the tasks in your day, you can see exactly where your hours (like your money) are going. Productivity breeds productivity.

4. Think about what “Time well spent” really means to you

If time was an app, it would be Postmates: We use it without realizing how much we’re spending.

You can’t purchase more time. Taking stock of your day and looking at how you spend your time will move you into the following days with confidence. If you’re really spending your time “well”— which is different for everyone—it’s infectious.

We don’t want to know how much time we’ve wasted scrolling social media for “research” or texting a colleague.

Watching the clock doesn’t have to be a negative. In fact, watching the clock can help you, professionally speaking. Keeping track of your time worked and just how much you’ve accomplished in a day can be helpful in assessing where you are losing valuable hours.

5. Stop watching the clock

OK. Disregard *for a second* what we said above.

Time batching and keeping track of your hours is important, but only to a point. Within the time that you’ve allocated for yourself, don’t check the clock like a kid waiting for the lunch bell to ring.

Being productive is more important than checking to make sure you’re being productive. If you’re in the swing of it, by all means, keep rolling.

This article was originally published on Create and Cultivate.

 

Insomnia Series: How to Get More Sleep and Be Just as Productive

See Author Article Here
By Megy Karydes

Most of us wish we could get more done in a day. Sometimes we sacrifice sleep to cram more during our waking hours, except we often do so at our peril.

We know sleep is essential and sleep deprivation wreaks havoc on our bodies, making it harder to concentrate, control our impulses or retain information.

Better sleep translates to better productivity and a healthier well-being. Not only does lack of sleep cost us our health, it’s costing the United States about $411 billion in lost productivity, according to one study.

Sleep impacts every aspect of our life yet it’s often overlooked when it comes to the workplace. A survey of 1,000 Americans across a variety of industries on their sleep and work satisfaction conducted by The Sleep Judge, a company that provides mattress and sleep product reviews, showed nearly four in five employees satisfied with sleep weren’t looking for another job. However, employees dissatisfied with sleep were 50 percent more likely to be looking.

According to the productivity study, researchers found that a person who sleeps on average less than six hours a night has a 13 percent higher mortality risk than someone sleeping between seven and nine hours. Performance issues due to lack of enough quality sleep have become such a concern that some companies are trying to mind the nap gap by doing everything from introducing sleep pods in the office where employees can nap, to halting email after a certain time.

Some industries cannot apply these kinds of ideas. Those who work in retail or transportation, for example, usually cannot go sleep in a pod or need to worry about email after hours and yet they’re the ones who suffer from the highest levels of sleep deprivation, according to The Sleep Judge survey.

While companies might not be able to be able to afford to give everyone a raise, the evidence shows helping employees get good sleep can positively impact culture and retention, according to The Sleep Judge survey results.

“We do want to emphasize that ultimately it is the responsibility of the individual to make sure they are getting the sleep they need,” Tyler Burchett, who is working on behalf of the creative team for The Sleep Judge, shared with me via email.

“That said, there are definitely things employers can do to help workers, and not sending texts/emails after hours is a great start. Another common thing that many companies are doing is making later start times. There’s a lot of benefits for starting at 10:00 A.M. rather than 9:00 A.M., from more time to sleep in the morning to avoiding rush hour.”

Employees can also take matters into their own hands. Here are three ways to help yourself be more productive while getting the sleep you need:

1. Figure out your chronotype.

Your sleep chronotype is recognizing when your body most likely wants to sleep and taking advantage of letting it rest when it needs to so you can wake up refreshed. Knowing that detail will help you determine when you’re most productive. If you’re more productive in the early hours, perhaps you can seek out jobs that allow you to go in early so you can wrap up earlier, too.

2. Go to bed at the same time every night.

Even on evenings where you don’t have to work the next morning. Research shows that sleep debt is hard to make up and sleep deprivation not only hurts our productivity, but it’s also harmful to our health.

3. Ask your employer if they’re willing to work with you.

Another common option for employers, according to Burchett, is to transition their workforce to include more remote employees. “When employees don’t have to contend with a morning commute, it can add a lot more time for sleep,” he said. Another idea is to allow employees to start an hour later so they can avoid rush hour traffi

Burchett admitted that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Still, taking the time to consider how sleep affects our minds and bodies, whether it’s us taking charge or employers taking innovative steps to make life better for their workers, is time well-spent.

Some Things To Remember When You Think You’re Not Doing Well Enough

See ThoughtCatalog Article Here
By Kovie Biakolo

What do you measure yourself by? Your bank account? Your job? Your “stuff”? The number of people you know and/or know you? Your accomplishments? Whether you’re meeting and checking the timeline and timetable of society’s social requirements for who you should be? All of the above?

It’s hard not to feel like life is some sort of race. After all, if there is one thing all of us can agree is a limited resource, it’s time. And because of our uncertain relationship with how much time we have, we can feel that what we want, what we aspire to do or own or be, can only be achieved within the frame of this limited resource – time.

There’s a pressure in being cognizant of time. A pressure that causes us to look at ourselves and compare our lives to others’ – even with limited information. A pressure that at times makes us resent our circumstances, present or past. A pressure that can feel crippling and infuriating and unjust. And sometimes it can feel that no matter how hard we try, how hard we fight, how much we work, and how badly we want it – we’re just not there.

And sometimes it can feel that no matter how hard we try, how hard we fight, how much we work, and how badly we want it – we’re just not there.

There is a place, that though mostly is a figment of our imagination, it feels as real as anything tangible. There is the place that we dream of, the place we tell ourselves that our happiness and desires can finally be realized. There is the place, we think, we will be satisfied and full and accomplished.

The reality of there, however, is that it always seems to change. The more success you have, the more you’ll likely want. The closer you are to the life of your fantasies, the greater those fantasies become. It’s human nature but it’s also simple economics: human wants are insatiable. And especially when you’re young and privileged and bright and have been told the world is at your feet, you work for and hope for and want all those things the world said you could be.

But experience hits you. The reality of what it takes to be those things in spite of your talent or hard work or circumstance, hits you. And it hits you over and over again, each time chipping away at those dreams and desires. But you resist, after all you’re young, and you’re resilient. Still, no matter how much hope you hold onto, you question: Can I really do this? Is it really worth it? Am I just not good enough?

That question can be crippling – “Am I just not good enough?” But I wonder, good enough for what? Good enough for the societal standards we are all meant to live by? Good enough for the aspirations you have set your heart on? Good enough to be the person that you’d always said you were meant to become?

That question can be crippling – “Am I just not good enough?”

The truth is maybe you are and maybe you aren’t. Especially when it comes to society’s arbitrary rules on who you should be and what you should want, and how your dreams fit into all of this. It’s difficult to know whether to call it quits and find a new dream, or whether to keep fighting the good fight. It’s difficult when you know the odds are against you, or that “the rules” are designed to make winners and losers, or that luck exists, or that life is unfair and unevenly cruel. It’s difficult, in spite of the words of poets and artists and intellectuals, to believe that your dreams can really come true. Instead it feels more than anything else, that all dreams have done, is made you crippled with anxiety and dissatisfied with life. What does one do in these moments?

One thing that helps me in such moments is to focus on the task at hand. I’ve learned to focus on what I can do today every time I feel crippled by fear and anxiety and the unrelenting desire to be more than I am. Because the truth is that we must put in the work, but we must never be so pompous as to believe that the work in and of itself is enough to get us where we want to be. We are not in charge of it all, and that’s not superstition, that’s fact. We might need someone to take a chance on us, someone to believe in us, a stroke of luck, or the intervention of divine providence. And knowing this can be freeing, it can be the liberty you need to do your very best, while knowing that the world too must do its part.

Above all, the thing I find the most helpful when I feel defeated is to remember the previous time I felt like this. The last time I thought I wasn’t good enough, the last time I felt crippled by fear and anxiety of not being good enough – did I not survive it? Is it just not a temporary feeling like anything else? Indeed it was, indeed it is.

Chances are, as I realized in those times, when you think of time andthere and experience, and the reality of how much is in your hands, and how much is not, you need to remember that even in those moments of what feels like crippling defeat or failure or the feeling that you are not enough – you’re probably doing much better than you think. And should you ever forget that, close your eyes, and listen to the sound of yourself breathing; that reminder of your life force. My dear friend, that is hope, and as long as that remains, you are enough.

The Single Most Important Action To Take Right Now To Make You Successful

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By

Throughout the year we make personal commitments of things we want to change for the better. Diets, exercise, family, work, travel etc. For many of us, we take on multiple resolutions with every intention of improving ourselves for the better. Too often, we fail to kick start and sustain the new “US.” Goals become overwhelming and we fall into the trap of never achieving what we set out to do.

The complex formula of success
So much information exists on what success is and how to achieve it. Articles with headings such as “30 Things Successful People Do Differently” capture our attention with the hope of inspiring us to take meaningful action.

The problem is that’s 30 things we are to remember and implement to supposedly achieve success. One article I recently read listed their number one step to success being “Internalizing your locus of control.”

Locus of control? What does that even mean?

These articles can provide meaningful insights but they often overpower us and end up being nothing more than an informative read.

Inspiring? Sometimes. Actionable. No.

Success is not a complex formula. It is far simpler.

Excuses over results
Success can come at any time. We get caught in the trap at looking at success as this grandiose plan that must start and be completed by self-defined timeframes and prescribed results. It becomes so daunting that we give up because we can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. As we try to achieve our goals, they don’t come fast enough and we use this as an excuse to give up. We end up being our own worst enemy.

You can either have results or you can have an excuse, but you cannot have both.

Take someone’s plans to lose weight. They set a goal to lose 30 pounds which includes a diet plan and workout regime. They are initially dedicated to working out multiple times a week and stick to a strict meal plan. It’s tough at first but as several weeks go by they start to feel better about themselves. More energy, clothes feeling a little looser and an overall more positive attitude. Then they step on the scale at the end of the month to find they have only lost 2lbs!

The minimal weight loss is deflating after all that dedicated, hard work. They start to lose steam. Workouts get missed. Diets get blown. Before long the excuse “I can’t do this” enters the mind and the weight loss plan is in the scrap bin.

The amazing results achieved in a single month get buried and forgotten. More on those amazing resulting in a minute.

The secret of success: One step
One small step. That is all it is. A single step is all it takes to move towards success. It’s so fundamentally simple and yet so easily overlooked.

It’s the greatest secret never to be told by successful people. We read about other’s success and can’t imagine how we could ever achieve the same. They are so successful and have achieved so many amazing things that we see them in a different league. What we fail to realize is that these successful people all started with a single, first step. Then they took another step and another. Before long they had a mile of steps behind them and the second mile didn’t seem so bad. They kept going and went on to build massive momentum. Always looking forward. Never back.

Sure there are missteps. People outside of the successful stream of consciousness look at missteps as failures. Successful people don’t’ see failure. They see opportunities to learn, reflect and move forward. Always achieving greater success than when they started.

Celebrate each step
Each small step you take is a pause for celebration. Your decision to spend more time with the family. The first day at the gym. Booking that amazing trip abroad. Deciding to make a career change. Those are all small steps worthy of applause

Celebrate each and every step of success along the way.

Imagine how many of us would stick to our weight loss plans if we instead focused on the many positive steps we took in the first month and not the actual loss of weight.

Let’s break it down. Attended the gym. Ate healthy. More energy. Looser clothes. Multiple small steps all worthy of celebration. Each step building on the previous. It’s all about changing your perspective. It’s amazing when you change your frame of mind how you can view something that seemed so insignificant really isn’t. Two pounds is no longer weighing you down. That’s worth celebrating and continuing with your step journey.

You can start your new YOU whenever you chose. Start small and take one little step at a time. Push yourself forward because no one else is going to do it for you. All it takes is a single step.

Clark Glassford is the founder of My Practice Interview. The company’s purpose is to inspire others to achieve their dream career. My Practice Interview provides industry-leading services including tailored resume writing, curated LinkedIn profiles and expert interview coaching delivering results beyond expectations.
http://www.mypracticeinterview.com

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