How To Spend The First Hour Of Your Work Day On High-Value Tasks

Author Article

Don’t begin the activities of your day until you know exactly what you plan to accomplish. Don’t start your day until you have it planned. — Jim RohnEvery morning, get one most important thing done immediately.There is nothing more satisfying than feeling like you’re already in the flow.And the easiest way to trigger this feeling is to work on your most important task in the first hour.Use your mornings for high-value workLean to avoid the busy work that adds no real value to your work, vision or long-term goal.

Low-value activities, including responding to notifications, or reacting to emails keep you busy and stop you from getting real work done. Make time for work that matters.

In his book, Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, David Allen says, “If you don’t pay appropriate attention to what has your attention, it will take more of your attention than it deserves.”

Research shows that it takes, on average, more than 23 minutes to fully recover your concentration after a trivial interruption.

Productive mornings start with early wake-up calls

“In a poll of 20 executives cited by Vanderkam, 90% said they wake up before 6 a.m. on weekdays.

PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi, for example, wakes at 4 a.m. and is in the office no later than 7 a.m.

Meanwhile, Disney CEO Bob Iger gets up at 4:30 to read, and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is up at 5:30 to jog.”

The first quiet hour of the morning can be the ideal time to focus on an important work project without being interrupted.

Don’t plan your day in the first hour of your morning

Cut the planning and start doing real work. You are most active on a Monday Morning.

Think about it. After a weekend of recovery, you have the most energy, focus and discipline to work on your priorities.

Don’t waste all that mental clarity and energy planning what to do in the next eight hours.

Do your planning the night before.

Think of Sunday as the first chance to prepare yourself for the week’s tasks.

Monday mornings will feel less dreadful and less overwhelming if you prepare the night before.

If you choose to prioritize …

There are one million things you could choose to do in your first hour awake.

If you choose to start your day with a daily check list/to-do list, make sure that next to every task you have the amount of time it will take to complete them.

The value of the of putting time to tasks is that, every time you check something off, you are able to measure how long it took you to get that task done, and how much progress you are making to better plan next time.

Get the uncomfortable out of the way

You probably know about Brian Tracy’s “eat-a-frog” – technique from his classic time-management book, Eat That Frog?

In the morning, right after getting up, you complete the most unwanted task you can think of for that day (= the frog).

Ideally you’ve defined this task in the evening of the previous day.

Completing an uncomfortable or difficult task not only moves it out of your way, but it gives you great energy because you get the feeling you’ve accomplished something worthwhile.

Do you have a plan from yesterday?

Kenneth Chenault, former CEO and Chairman of American Express, once said in an interview that the last thing he does before leaving the office is to write down the top 3 things to accomplish tomorrow, then using that list to start his day the following morning.

This productivity hack works for me.

It helps me focus and work on key tasks. It also helps me disconnect at the end of the day and allow time for my brain to process and reboot.

Trust me, planning your day the night before will give you back a lot wasted hours in the morning and lower your stress levels.

Try this tonight.

If you’re happy with the results, then commit to trying it for a week.

After a week, you’ll be able to decide whether you want to add “night-before planning” to your life.

Want to get more done in less time?

You need systems not goals. I’m creating a new course, Systems For Getting Work Done to help you create a personal productivity system to get 10X more done in less time. Sign up to be notified when it launches.

This article first appeared on Medium.

To Feel Happier At Work, Share ‘The Real You’

Author Article Link

The study examines 65 studies focusing on what happens after people in a workplace disclose a stigmatized identity, such as sexual orientation, mental illness, physical disability, or pregnancy.

Eden King, a coauthor of the study and an associate professor of psychology at Rice University, calls the decision to express a stigmatized identity highly complicated.

“It has the potential for both positive and negative consequences,” she says.

The research overwhelmingly indicates, however, that people with non-visible stigmas (such as sexual orientation or health problems) who live openly at work are happier with their overall lives and more productive in the workplace. Self-disclosure is typically a positive experience because it allows people to improve connections, form relationships with others, and free their minds of unwanted thoughts, King says.

Workers who expressed their non-visible stigmas experienced decreased job anxiety, decreased role ambiguity, improved job satisfaction, and increased commitment to their position. Outside of work, these people reported decreased psychological stress and increased satisfaction with their lives.

But the study found that the same results did not apply to people with visible traits, such as race, gender, and physical disability.

“Identities that are immediately observable operate differently than those that are concealable,” King says. “The same kinds of difficult decisions about whether or not to disclose the identity—not to mention the questions of to whom, how, when, and where to disclose those identities—are probably less central to their psychological experiences.”

Because most people appreciate gaining new information about others, the expression of visible stigmas is likely to have less of an impact, King says.

“Also, people react negatively to those who express or call attention to stigmas that are clearly visible to others, such as race or gender, as this may be seen as a form of advocacy or heightened pride in one’s identity,” she says.

The researchers say more work will help understand the motivations for expressing different stigmas. They say they hope the meta-analysis will help workplaces and policymakers protect individuals with stigmas from discrimination.

The study appears in the Journal of Business and Psychology. Additional coauthors are from Rice University; Texas A&M University; the University of Memphis; Xavier University; Portland State University; and the University of California, Berkeley.

Source: Rice University

How To Get A Job Without Prior Experience

Author Article

Here’s the challenge everyone who starts their career faces: You can’t get a job because you don’t have experience, but you can’t get experience without getting a job.It’s called the experience paradox or Catch-22 of getting a job. It’s a real challenge. And if you can’t overcome it, you can easily set your career 3 to 5 years back.


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Worse, I’ve seen young folks and people who switch careers destroy their potential by making the wrong decisions early on.

I don’t want to scare you. You can still overcome the Catch-22; but not with conventional career advice. Because what’s the standard advice for people who want to build a career?

“Create a resume, browse job boards, and respond to job applications.” Sorry to disappoint you. If you take that route, you will end up like most people: Frustrated and underpaid.

Don’t worry, there’s a different way. With the right strategy, you can break into any industry and earn what you’re worth.

But I have to warn you. It takes at least twice as much work. However, that shouldn’t be a surprise to you. If you want to have a better career than most folks, guess what; you have to BE better than most folks.

When you do the following 2 things, you will become better—that will significantly increase your odds of getting a job without prior experience.

1. Be The Person You Would Hire

Why is it that companies prefer to hire experienced people for a role? When I started my career, I didn’t understand it.

The reality is that there’s a massive difference between someone who doesn’t have experience at a particular job and someone who has two years under their belt.

Even though two years might not sound like a lot of time, it’s actually a lot of time to learn the ins and outs of a job. And especially when you recently got out of college; because your first two to three years are all about learning to be a professional.

Some people never become serious about their careers. They wake up at a time so they can come to the office just in time. They prefer to sleep in. And they are the first to leave at 5 pm. They don’t ask questions, don’t seek out mentors, LOVE their lunch break, and chit-chat with their co-workers every chance they get.

Imagine you would be the CEO of a company. Would you want a person like that on your team? Of course not.

I must be honest; I used to be like that too. But I realized that attitude will not bring you far. If you want career success, you need to take it seriously. You only get rewarded for results. And what brings results? Skills.

Now, the good news is that increasingly more companies are putting emphasis on the skills of the people they want to hire—not their experience.

In his book, The Virgin Way, I read that Richard Branson, the famous founder of Virgin (that employs approximately 71,000 people), hires for character and skills. He prefers to actually get to know applicants instead of asking them a bunch of boring questions.

If you seek out companies who hire for experience and skills, you have a good chance of getting hired—even if you don’t have experience.

There’s only one condition: You must be a person YOU would hire. Someone who’s not only a professional but also has the skills to do a good job. If you feel like your skills are not that good yet, spend more time on your craft.

So how do you find a company that hires for skills and character? You ask.

Look, getting a job is NOT easy. It requires a lot of manual labor. Sometimes you need to reach out to hundreds of people to even get an interview. So that’s what you do. Be ready to do whatever it takes.

You reach out to people in HR of companies you’d like to work for. And you ask them about their interview process. How does the application process work? What are the characteristics you’re looking for in candidates?

You can use that information to apply for jobs you’re interested in. But unlike people who blindly apply, you know what they are looking for.

2. Do Free Work

Often, being good at your job and having information about the application process won’t cut it.

I’m a big fan of demonstrating your skills instead of talking about it. During the interview, we only talk. But when you offer to do free work for a company, you actually demonstrate your skills in a real-life setting.

So how can you do free work? Larry Stybel, a clinical psychologist, wrote an article for HBR about his experience launching his career. He shares 3 great tips:

  1. Look for a company you’d love to work for and then be specific about what value you will provide—What will you exactly do for the company? No need to overpromise. It’s better to be honest about what you can. Identify a person you want to work for, and reach out to them directly. Also send your resume along (watch my video on how to create a graphic resume with Canva for tips).
  2. Be specific about what value you will receive—Start with the end in mind. What do you want to get out of it? A reference? A potential job? Experience?
  3. Be specific about the time frame—You don’t want to keep working for free forever. In Stybel’s example, he said: “I promised to work two days a week for two months.” Often, you can’t even work full-time for free. Nor is it something I recommend. Use your time to keep searching for a job.

One of the key lessons for everyone launching their career is to consider yourself as a learning machine. When you feel too proud to learn or work for free, you will be stuck sooner than later.

But when you keep improving yourself and reaching out to people in the industry you want to work in, it will ultimately lead to a real job.

This article first appeared on Darius Foroux

5 Ways Bosses Can Reduce the Stigma of Mental Health at Work

Author Article

Experts tell us that one in four adults will struggle with a mental health issue during his or her lifetime. At work, those suffering — from clinical conditions or more minor ones — often hide it for fear that they may face discrimination from peers or even bosses. These stigmas can and must be overcome. But it takes more than policies set at the top. It also requires empathetic action from managers on the ground.

We count ourselves among those who have wrestled with mental health challenges. One morning a few years ago, in the midst of a successful year, Jen couldn’t get out of bed. As a driven professional, she had ignored all the warning signs that she was experiencing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). But her mentor, Diana, could see something was wrong, and when Jen couldn’t come to work, the gravity of the situation became even clearer. In the ensuing weeks, we worked together to get Jen the help she needed.

Diana understood Jen’s struggles because she had been there, too — not with PTSD but with anxiety. As the mother of adult triplets with autism and a busy job, she’d often had difficulty managing things in her own life.

Throughout both of our careers, we have moved across the spectrum of mental health from thriving to barely hanging on, and somewhere in between. What we’ve learned through our own experiences is how much managerial support matters.

When bosses understand mental health issues — and how to respond to them — it can make all the difference for an employee professionally and personally. This involves taking notice, offering a helping hand, and saying “I’m here, I have your back, you are not alone.”

That’s exactly what Jen said when a coworker told her that he was grappling with anxiety; it had gotten to the point where it was starting to impact his work and his relationships at home. He came to her because she’d been open about her own struggles. She listened to him, worked to understand what accommodations he needed, and told him about available resources, such as Employee Assistance Programs. Then she continued to check in to see he was getting support he needed and make it clear that she and others were there to help.

How do you learn or teach the people on your team to address colleagues’ or direct reports’ mental health issues in the same way? Here are five ways managers can help drive a more empathetic culture:

Pay attention to language. We all need to be aware of the words we use that can contribute to stigmatizing mental health issues: “Mr. OCD is at it again — organizing everything.” “She’s totally schizo today!” “He is being so bi-polar this week — one minute he’s up, the next he’s down.” We’ve heard comments like these, maybe even made them ourselves. But through the ears of a colleague who has a mental health challenge, they can sound like indictments. Would you open up about a disorder or tell your team leader you needed time to see a therapist after hearing these words?

Rethink “sick days.” If you have cancer, no one says, “Let’s just push through” or “Can you learn to deal with it?” They recognize that it’s an illness and you’ll need to take time off to treat it. If you have the flu, your manager will tell you to go home and rest. But few people in business would react to emotional outbursts or other signs of stress, anxiety, or manic behavior in the same way. We need to get more comfortable with the idea of suggesting and requesting days to focus on improving mental as well as physical health.

Encourage open and honest conversations. It’s important to create safe spaces for people to talk about their own challenges, past and present, without fear of being called “unstable” or passed up for the next big project or promotion. Employees shouldn’t fear that they will be judged or excluded if they open up in this way. Leaders can set the tone for this by sharing their own experiences, as we’ve done, or stories of other people who have struggled with mental health issues, gotten help and resumed successful careers. They should also explicitly encourage everyone to speak up when feeling overwhelmed or in need.

Be proactive. Not all stress is bad, and people in high-pressure careers often grow accustomed to it or develop coping mechanisms. However, prolonged unmanageable stress can contribute to worsening symptoms of mental illness. How can managers ensure their employees are finding the right balance? By offering access to programs, resources, and education on stress management and resilience-building. In our marketplace survey on employee burnout, nearly 70 percent of respondents said that their employers were not doing enough to prevent or alleviate burnout. Bosses need to do a better job of helping their employees connect to resources before stress leads to more serious problems.

Train people to notice and respond. Most offices keep a medical kit around in case someone needs a bandage or an aspirin. We’ve also begun to train our people in Mental Health First Aid, a national program proven to increase people’s ability to recognize the signs of someone who may be struggling with a mental health challenge and connect them to support resources. Through role plays and other activities, they offer guidance in how to listen non-judgmentally, offer reassurance, and assess the risk of suicide or self-harm when, for example, a colleague is suffering a panic attack or reacting to a traumatic event. These can be difficult, emotionally charged conversations, and they can come at unexpected times, so it’s important to be ready for them.

When your people are struggling, you want them to be able to open up and ask for help. These five strategies can help any boss or organization create a culture that ceases to stigmatize mental illness.

Here’s Why Your Job Is Causing You Stress And What You Can Do

Author Article

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Americans are collectively dissatisfied with their professions.According to a recent Gallup study, 51% of US workers don’t feel any kind of meaningful connection to their careers – with 16% outing their dejection as the author of their poor performances.

Because we devote so much time to the thing that pays our bills (92,120 hours over the course of a lifetime to be exact)  our sense of self-worth has become beclouded. Of course, a delusion of purpose operates with a great many other components.

Let’s dissect.

Aimless and undervalued

A general crisis of professional identity has been brewing for some time. Ladders has previously reported about how “a lack of recognition” is one of the primary factors that seduce many young workers into a perpetual state of career readjustment:

“The 2017 Mind the Workplace report, released by the nonprofit group Mental Health America (MHA) and The Faas Foundation, surveyed more than 17,000 U.S. workers in 19 industries and found that 71% were either “actively looking for new job opportunities” or had the topic on their minds “always, often or sometimes” at work.”

On balance, Millennials believe their wages to be a poor representation of the work they put in–this poses a huge problem. Validation rivals most monetary incentives from where I sit, especially to those of us being compensating for doing the things we’re passionate about. A failure on the employers part to satisfy pangs of ego (not that they ought to) seems to be resulting in workers miserably submitting to mediocrity in the fields they’re falling out of love with.

recently wrote about the effect the college myth has had on our evaluation of meaningful careers. The erroneous equivocation of degrees and wages, caused many people to lose sight of what it was they needed to feel satisfied at work – when education becomes a means to economic stability, identity tends to get lost in the exchange.

There is a wealth of reasons to be miserable at work outside of the existential ones, of course. Factors like the commute, stagnation, your coworkers, your boss, long-hours,  also play crucial roles over time.

Performative workaholism and pervasive career malaise have melded, giving way to the most depressed labor ecosystem in decades. In a recent study, 63% of Americans said that their job caused them to engage in unhealthy behavior, like crying and or drinking. Work-related stress also rivals diabetes as a heart disease risk factor.

Care about your job, Be passionate about yourself

According to and 

The book mentions 7 key authors of our daily work anxiety, Fosslien and Mollie call them the “7 deadly stresses:” obsessing about email on vacation, the scope creep (continuous arbitrary growth in a project’s scope), unpredictable schedules, the information firehouse, sleep deprivation, unrealistic deadlines, and social isolation.

On the subject, they state: “Letting your job consume you is unhelpful and unhealthy. It makes small problems seem exceptional and places too much emphasis on casual conversations and interactions.”

They believe that caring less is not only personally relieving, it also makes you less likely to produce panicky incompetent work. The same impulse that will see you turn off your phone so that you can be more engaged in your life outside of work, will dually foster a clear and level headed mind ready to be productive the following morning. They emphasize that being “less passionate” about work doesn’t mean not caring; you should simply care about yourself more.

When you leave work, they suggest you ensure you truly “leave” by adhering to these helpful stipulations: only touch email once, allow one day a week to be completely dedicated to catching up (don’t take on any new task), make room for mini-breaks, and establish an after-work ritual, like bike riding home – something that can serve both mental and physical stimulation.

How To Work With People Who Aren’t Self-Aware

Forbes Article

Team of colleagues working togetherGETTY

It’s no secret that self-awareness is essential if you want to be successful. Perhaps that’s why an overwhelming percentage of professionals — 95 percent, to be exact — believe they’re self-aware. In reality, only 10 percent to 15 percent actually merit the “self-aware” badge. That means there’s a strong probability you’re working with people who lack self-awareness.

What can you do to work more effectively with these people? Can you “enhance” their self-awareness, or should you focus on developing your own mental strength instead? Inflicting damage on a relationship isn’t ideal, particularly if the person won’t change, anyway.

But when someone lacks self-awareness, he’s not the only one who suffers — the people around him struggle, too. Here’s how you can overcome the problems caused by people who truly don’t know what they don’t know.

Lacking Self-Awareness or Just Exhibiting Bad Behavior?

First things first: Are you sure you’re actually working with people who aren’t self-aware? Is it possible some of your co-workers are just behaving badly?

Additionally, is there tension between you due to a lack of communication? Do you have different priorities? Do you trust each other? Are your personalities polar opposites?

Before assuming that someone lacks self-awareness, take the time to really think about what’s behind the tension so you can address the root problem. It may be a simple fix, like asking him to not speak as loudly on the phone or asking to be moved to another area of the office. For more serious offenses, like harassing or bullying others, you need to address the issue with your superiors or HR.

If you want to know whether you’re working with someone who lacks self-awareness, begin by asking your colleagues how they feel about this specific individual. It’s important to ask in a curious way, seeking information about their experiences rather than gossip. In most cases, there’s a general consensus about a person’s behavior — you’re not the only one with a problem or concern.

Most employees who’ve worked with people lacking in self-awareness generally agree that their colleagues display the following behaviors:

  • They don’t listen to others.
  • They’re unwilling to give or receive feedback.
  • Without realizing it, they’re hurtful to others.
  • They can’t empathize with others or put themselves in someone else’s shoes.
  • They’re more than willing to accept credit for successes, but they’re also quick to blame others for failure.
  • They have an overblown opinion of their performance and how much they contribute.
  • They aren’t able to “read a room” and change their message based on the audience.

However, the biggest giveaway is this: The unaware don’t know their weaknesses and shortcomings. Most of them want to be effective team members. Offensive office jerks know exactly what they’re doing and aren’t receptive to change. Those lacking self-awareness don’t even realize they’re offending others.

Dealing With an ‘Unaware’ Colleague

If you’ve determined you’re working with someone who isn’t self-aware, what steps can you take to survive working together on a daily basis?

Ask yourself, “Can he or she be helped?” It’s important to realize that while you can help people see the errors of their ways, the decision to change is theirs. That doesn’t mean you can’t impact their self-awareness, but accepting the limits of your own behavior is key to not creating a loop of lacking awareness.

Provide caring and honest feedback. Whether they want to change or not, you can still make them aware of their faults. Of course, there’s no need to belittle or harshly criticize people who lack self-awareness. Instead, discuss with them privately how their behavior is affecting others. By responsibly handling a conversation that impacts someone else, you’re modeling the behavior you want to see.

It’s also good to offer specific alternatives. Just imagine someone pulling you aside and telling you you’re creating a toxic workplace. You’d probably be a little hurt, even angry. “What exactly did I do to make working conditions so intolerable?” But if he came to you and said instead that you don’t handle criticism well and, as a result, get short with others, making collaboration challenging, you’d hear the message.

Focus on what you can control. While you may not be successful in controlling others’ behavior or emotions, you have control over how you react. Start by strengthening your own emotional intelligence. Become more mindful, and meditate when you’re stressed. While your co-worker may still lack self-awareness, you can keep your own emotions in check.

Develop Your Own Mental Toughness

Regardless of whether your unaware colleague is receptive to your suggestions, there’s always a chance that a new hire down the road will be equally unaware. It’s even possible you’ll have a bad day and become the problematic teammate yourself.

We’re all going to have to overcome obstacles and difficult situations. The only way to break through these roadblocks is by developing mental toughness. I’ve found the suggestions from LaRae Quy, who spent 23 years as a counterintelligence agent with the FBI, to be an excellent starting point.

Start by working on your own emotional awareness. Remain aware of your emotions, and walk yourself through ways to control your resulting reactions. With increased awareness, you’ll be able to better understand others’ emotions and anticipate or empathize with their perspective.

Get uncomfortable. This isn’t easy, but getting out of your comfort zone will help you grow as a person. Learn new information. Read as much as possible. Try new things, and learn from failure yourself. Eventually, you may notice that the little things that bothered you before weren’t really a big deal.

Focus. This is all about focusing your mental and physical energy to become successful. Begin by soliciting feedback, getting your ego in check, and keeping your goals in front of you. By focusing on the positive, you won’t get distracted by the negative.

Conflicts in the workplace are inevitable. However, if you’re mentally tough and self-aware, these problems won’t fester into something worse. What’s more, you may possess the right qualities to inspire others to become more self-aware themselves.

John is the co-founder of Calendar, author of best-selling book “Top of Mind,” and keynote speaker. You can sign up for early access to Calendar here!

How To Change Your Career for a Happier Life

Author Article

How To Change Your Career for a Happier Life

In today’s world, there are a lot of people stuck in jobs that they hate. You would be surprised to know just how many people go to work just for the paycheck, sacrificing their happiness for money every single day. Your degree or work experience should not have to dictate the career you choose. You should strive to get into a profession that fulfills you and makes you happy. As the saying goes, do what makes you happy and the money will follow. Career changes are never as bad as people claim they are, and if it is your happiness at stake, then it is definitely worth it. It is never too late to get into a profession you are passionate about and one that you are actually good at.

So have you been wondering whether it’s time for a career change? If so, there are a few tell-tale signs that can help you make up your mind. Here is how to tell whether it is time to change careers.

  1. An Event in Your Life Has Sparked A New Interest

Major events in our lives can make us reevaluate our priorities. The birth of a child could make you realize you actually need to spend more time at home with the family. A marriage proposal could make you change your mind about taking that job abroad. Sometimes, smaller everyday things can have a similar effect. A youtube video you watched could make you realize just how cool locksmithing really is and push you in that direction.

If an event in your life has lit a spark in you, sometimes it is wise to follow that little voice. It might open you up to opportunities you otherwise may never have had.

  1. Your Current Career Does Not Fit With Your Values

Our values are important to us. They guide our lives and determine how we make decisions. If your current job does not respect what you stand for, you may feel a distinct disconnect with the work. For example, if you are a creative spirit and you believe in always searching for new opportunities for self-expression, and your job provides little or no opportunity for this value, you may realize that it is not the right fit. Then it would be time for a career change.

  1. Your Current Career Just Happened

Sometimes we just find ourselves doing some jobs. We may be pretty good at the said job, but we may have landed there without actually even wanting the job in the first place. Maybe the job runs in the family, or a friend got you that position. All you know is that you do not see yourself doing that job for the rest of your life. If this describes you, then it is definitely time for a career change.

  1. You Are Interested In An Evolving Field

The world today is not what it was 20 years ago. Changes in technology have led to the creation of completely new professions. For example, jobs in social media marketing and app development or remote workingwere almost unheard of twenty years ago. If you fancy yourself a pioneer, you may want to consider getting into one of these fast-evolving fields while they are still in their infancy. This way, you could write the rulebook of how to do what you do.

Once you have made up your mind to get a new start in life career-wise, there are a few steps you can take to ensure a successful transition.

  1. Find out how satisfied you are with your current job. Evaluate your current job satisfaction, and determine what you like or dislike about it.
  2. Determine your interests, outline your values, and list your skills.
  3. Brainstorm alternative careers. With your interests, values, and skills, what else can you potentially do?
  4. Research job options. Compare the jobs that interest you and determine what could work for you.
  5. Reach out to people in those fields. If you have contacts in those sectors, find out as much as you can about what they do and how they do it.
  6. Freelance. If they are accepting volunteers or interns in the fields you are looking at, sign up. Try it out and see how you like it.
  7. Upgrade. Take classes, brush up your skills, and become better and more marketable in the said field.
  8. Consider Vocational Training.
  9. Consider becoming a life coach.

Vocational Training is an essential step to choosing a new career ad mastering a new skill. It can be the perfect way to determine what you are good at. If you know what you are good at and you know exactly what you are looking for, finding a new career to settle into will be a breeze.

Vocational Training is structured differently than university education. If you want flexibility, hands-on training, speed and a specialization in a particular career, vocational training may be the best fit for you. It is perfect for people who know what they want and just need the training to get there. Plus, you’ll have the ability to earn a diploma or even a degree for your position, becoming a real certified master of whatever skill you choose to study.

Example: Changing Your Job To Become A Locksmith

Locksmithing may be the perfect career for you if you are fascinated with locks, puzzles, how things work, and ethical correction. In recent years, it has become one of the most underrated but highly lucrative professions on the planet. Locksmiths are an essential part of today’s society, especially with the ever-increasing need for tighter security features in our everyday life. Whether it is at home, school, or at work, we interact with the handiwork of master locksmiths every day.

If you are the inquisitive creative type who loves to learn how things work, a move to locksmithing would make the perfect career move. What’s more, as a locksmith, you can easily start your business and laugh all the way to the bank because it is such a rare skill. Additionally, when you become the master of this skill, global doors will open for you. Imagine being at the helm of an international locksmithing company that you built from scratch. Sounds far-fetched? Well, it isn’t, and you could be living this very dream if you play your cards right.

The beauty of this career move is that it is so easy to accomplish. With adequate guidance, this is the one move that could possibly open so many doors for you and be the ultimate source of your happiness and eventual success. Furthermore, locksmiths are adventurers and explorers, always searching for newer and more creative ways to do what they do. What this means is that a locksmithing business can open international doors for you, especially since locksmiths love to learn from each other so much. Changing one’s country for a new business perspective is not unheard of, and this move almost always leads to even more success.

If you want to move to a new country in search of a fresh business perspective, the perfect way to do it is by contacting your professional employer organization.

When all is said and done, changing a career can be the perfect way to attain that happier working life you have always been searching for. And if you are a creative person who loves learning the working mechanics of stuff, then locksmithing may just be the career for you!