Want to Live to a Happy, Successful 90 Years Old? This 16-Year Study Says Drinking Wine and Coffee Will Help

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Look, I’m as skeptical as you are when a scientific study tells us something we really want to hear. That’s not the way it’s supposed to work. Eggs will kill you, the delicious Bloomin’ Onion is literally the worst food for you on the planet, T-bone steaks will T-ank your blood pressure. That’s what I’m used to.

So it was with trepidation that I read about the wonderful, no, dare I say, transcendent, research findings on life longevity from the 90+ Study. The research findings were presented at the 2019 American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference by researchers Claudia Kawas and Maria Corrada from the University of California Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders.

The ongoing study, started 16 years ago, is intended to determine the factors of longevity including understanding what makes people live to age 90 and older and what types of food, activities, or lifestyles contribute to such long lives.

Participants in the study, referred to as “the oldest old” (which is what I feel like some days) are visited every six months by researchers who perform medical, physical, and cognitive tests and who gather dietary and lifestyle information.

Lo and behold, the research is finding that drinking wine (or other alcohol) and coffee in moderation leads to longer lifespans than for those who abstained. The key is, as with so many things in life, moderation.

Honestly, I don’t give a damn why the researchers came to this conclusion, they did, so just let me enjoy this.

Here’s why else this study is important and what else to do.

Let me instead ruminate on just how important this finding is, beyond the “finally, some good news from science” front. Anyone you talk to that enjoys wine and/or coffee will tell you it contributes to their happiness. And researchincreasingly supports that happiness leads to success, not the other way around. So the news of this study not only means that sipping a cup o’ joe and a glass o’ vino is good for life longevity, it will be a happier, more successful life at that.

But it would probably be irresponsible of me to suggest your life plan should stop at more Starbucks and Chardonnay. The study also touts the importance of more of what you’d expect, although even then, with a degree of surprise to it.

First, the more obvious. Life longevity is greatly enhanced by exercising 15 to 45 minutes each day, which reduces the risk of early death by 11 percent.

But this next one has a twist. The study also touts the importance of having hobbies so you can stay mentally sharp. In fact, spending two hours on a daily hobby reduces the risk of early death by a whopping 21 percent, almost twice that of exercising.

So in summary–the most important takeaways here are drink more wine, sip more coffee, and spend more time on your hobbies. At last, a prescription I can follow!

PUBLISHED ON: APR 6, 2019
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Scientists Have Discovered The Best Way To Combine Coffee And Naps So You Feel Less Tired

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Caffeine and napping have something in common. Both make you feel alert and can enhance your performance, whether that’s driving, working or studying. But some people are convinced that drinking a coffee before a nap gives you an extra zap of energy when you wake up.

How could that be? Is there any evidence to back the power of these so-called coffee naps? Or are we better off getting a good night’s sleep?

Coffee Linked To Youthful Skin And Longevity

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A controlled randomized study conducted on 100 healthy Europeans just vindicated you and your coffee obsession. As far as DNA integrity is concerned coffee is actually more beneficial than water.Over the course of a month (comprised of two periods), 50 men and 50 women were organized into two groups. The first served as the control group and were instructed to consume 500 ml of water a day with a precondition that disallowed them to imbibe coffee or any other kind of caffeinated drink.The second  group was instructed to consume 500 ml of freshly brewed dark roast a day.

At the end of each period, blood was drawn and analyzed by a single-cell gel electrophoresis in order to evaluate how DNA was affected by the two opposing diets.

The coffee group exhibited much less DNA strand breakage than the control group by the end of the 4-week span.

The Reasoning

The positive effect coffee has on repairing cells has been previously suggested on three separate occasions, once in 2011, 2015 and 2016.

All three studies used dark roast blends, though the correlation between the degree of effectiveness and the breed of coffee used has yet to be thoroughly tested.

As it stands–all coffee is rich with anti-oxidants, a compound that enables cells to better repair themselves in the wake of the damage done by free radicals. Free radicals, birthed by sunlight, oxygen and pollution,  deteriorate the collagen fibers in the skin. The microbial properties in coffee help ward off germs in the skin. Its caffetic acid boosts collagen levels which in turn reduces the aging process.

The antioxidants found in coffee are also instrumental in fighting diseases, preventing cavities, diabetes, siroccos of the liver and various forms of cancer.  The Journal Of The National Cancer Institutereports that habitual coffee drinkers were 20% less likely to develop malignant melanoma.

An epidemiological study published in Circulation back in 2015 found that people that drink coffee were 15% more likely to live longer than those that don’t. More specifically the subjects studied were less susceptible to neurological disorders, heart disease and even suicide.  Caffeine has been independently reported to prevent the development of Parkinson’s disease and drinkers express fewer instances of cognitive failure.

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