Prepare Yourself For The Best Night’s Sleep

Author Article

Sleep_resize_AmmielMendoza
Getting a good night’s sleep requires more than plopping down on your bed. In fact, sleep is an active process. While we snooze, we pass through several stages of sleep, each with its own distinct physiological changes. We also alternate between non-REM (rapid eye movement) — which serves to restore the body — and REM sleep, during which we dream and restore the brain. The time you spend in these stages varies by age, but a good night’s rest means the sleep should be continuous and uninterrupted.
Dim the lights throughout the house this evening. Gradually reducing the amount of light in your home will mimic the way sunlight goes down and help trigger sleepiness.
The urge to sleep is dictated by two natural forces. Our homeostatic sleep drive helps us balance our wakefulness with sleep. “It tells us we’re only good for so many hours of alertness before we become functionally intoxicated,” says Helene Emsellem, MD, director of the Center for Sleep and Wake Disorders in Chevy Chase, Maryland, and author of Snooze or Lose. Our circadian rhythm, on the other hand, regulates the timing of our sleepiness and wakefulness. You can thank your circadian rhythm for that daily afternoon slump, for instance.
Both forces are highly affected by our habits, our routines and even our exposure to sunlight. So, for truly sound slumber, it’s important to respect these internal drives and do things that gear your body for sleep — some folks call this practicing good sleep hygiene. Here’s how you can ensure that you’re properly prepped for a good night’s sleep.
Move That Body
A good workout that gets your heart pumping and muscles flexing works wonders on promoting sleep. Regular physical activity makes it easier for you to get to sleep and improves the quality of your sleep. For maximum benefit, avoid rigorous activity three to four hours before bed. Body temperature rises when you exercise, which can make it hard for you to get to sleep.
Get Some Sun
Exposure to sunlight influences circadian rhythm, which is controlled by brain cells in the hypothalamus. These cells respond to light and dark signals from our environment, and set off reactions in our bodies to either wake us up or make us sleepy. In the mornings, it triggers the release of cortisol, a stimulating hormone, which raises body temperature. “Sunlight is a strong stimulus for wakefulness in humans,” says Nancy Foldvary, DO, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at the Cleveland Clinic and author of The Cleveland Clinic Guide to Sleep Disorders. “So, getting sun exposure promotes wakefulness during the day and can help people sleep at night.” Darkness, on the other hand, triggers our brains to produce melatonin, a hormone that regulates circadian rhythm and promotes sleepiness.
Create A Sanctuary
Think of your bedroom as your private retreat where you go every night to be renewed. Here’s how to turn it into the ideal environment for sleep:
Look For A Mattress And A Pillow That Are Comfortable
Preferences for bedding vary widely, so be sure to test out a mattress for a good 15 minutes before you buy.
Set The Thermostat On The Cool Side
Body temperature naturally falls at night. By keeping the room cool, your body will mimic its surroundings.
Darken The Room With Shades And Curtains To Keep Out Light
You might even try using an eye mask. Darkness helps stimulate the production of melatonin, a hormone that promotes sleepiness.
Ditch the Electronics
Clear your bedroom of TVs, computers, and any other electronics. These gadgets emit blue light, which like any light, can cause wakefulness at night and disrupt the body’s natural inclination to sleep. Use your bedroom only for sleep (and sex), so you won’t associate it with any other activity.
Don’t Smoke
Poor sleep is just one more reason you shouldn’t light up. Smokers are four times more likely to report feeling unrested after a night’s sleep than nonsmokers. The smokers also spent less time in deep sleep and more time in light sleep. Smoking before bed pumps your body with nicotine, a stimulant that can keep you up at night. It also raises overall body temperature and elevates your heart rate and metabolism — all of which will keep you awake. To make matters worse, smokers go through withdrawal when they’re asleep, which disrupts their sleep, too.
Stick With A Routine
It doesn’t matter whether you soak in the tub, read a good book, or listen to your favorite music, the key is doing the same thing every night, so your body gets the signal that you’re prepping for sleep.
And, okay, we know you want to sleep in on the weekends and make up for the slumber lost during the week. But, don’t. Get in the habit of waking up and going to bed at the same time every night, even on weekends. Sleeping in on Saturdays and Sundays will only make it hard for you to get to sleep on Sunday night, and you’ll feel less refreshed on Monday.

5 Tips to Help You Sleep Better at Night

See Author Article Here
By

Sleep

Poor sleep can have negative effects on your physical, emotional, and mental health. When you don’t get enough sleep, you’re susceptible to weight gain, reduced brain function, and increased disease risk. On the other hand, getting enough sleep can boost cognitive function, help you feel more alert, and give you more energy throughout the day. If you want to get a good night’s sleep, here are five tips to promote better sleep.

1. Limit blue light exposure

While exposure to light during the day can have positive effects on your health, nighttime light exposure can trick your brain into thinking it’s still daytime, reducing melatonin production and delaying sleep. When exposed to blue light—the light that’s emitted from your smartphone and computer—your sleep can dramatically be affected. Either stop using screens at least two hours before bed or install a blue light blocker on your phone that can shield you from this type of light.

2. Regulate caffeine and alcohol intake

When consumed late in the day, caffeine can stimulate your nervous system and prevent you from naturally relaxing at night. Since caffeine can stay in your blood for six to eight hours, it’s probably not a good idea to sip on some coffee after mid-afternoon. If you’re really craving a cup of coffee, go for a decaffeinated option. Similar to caffeine, alcohol can increase symptoms of sleep apnea and snoring and disrupt sleep patterns. Because of this, try to avoid consuming alcohol before bed.

3. Get enough exercise during the day

Finding 20–30 minutes every day to work out has the potential to help you fall asleep faster. Working out helps the body produce endorphins, which act as natural painkillers and improve the ability to sleep at night. Even if you have a jam-packed schedule, go for a short walk after work or try out a yoga class with a friend.

4. Remove distractions from the bedroom

To create the most optimal sleep environment, address factors such as noise, temperature, and other external stimuli. External noise, like traffic or yelling, can cause poor sleep. Buy a white noise machine to cancel out these disruptive sounds. In addition to external noise, you’ll also want to regulate any indoor noise pollution. Repair appliances that create rattling sounds, opt for a sunrise clock instead of an alarm clock, and buy a sound-absorbing rug for your room. Regarding temperature, try to keep your room at 60–67 degrees—this is the optimal temperature for a good night’s sleep.

5. Follow a consistent sleep routine

Whether you like to curl up with a good book before dozing off or would rather take a warm bath and practice meditation, keep your bedtime routine consistent. Relaxation techniques before bed have shown to improve sleep quality and treat insomnia. Try a few different methods over the course of a week and find a routine that works best for you.